Nezu Museum, Tokyo: Where Art Meets Nature

Feeling tired after shopping in Harajuku, Tokyo’s heaven for fashionistas? Or feeling overwhelmed by contemporary architecture of designer boutiques in Omote-sando?

Just take a quick walk to Nezu Museum in Minami-Aoyama district (10 min from Omote-sando train station). There, you can have a quiet getaway from the city buzz and a glimpse of fine traditional Japanese art and culture, all in one place.

The entrance walk lined with a bamboo wall and bamboo trees on each side, designed by contemporary architect Kengo Kuma. Tokyo, Japan, October 2014.

The entrance walk lined with a bamboo wall and bamboo trees on each side, designed by contemporary architect Kengo Kuma. Tokyo, Japan, October 2014.

Opened in 1941 at the residence of industrialist and president of Tobu Railway, Nezu Kaichiro, Sr. (1860 – 1940), the museum houses a collection of Japanese, Chinese and Korean artefacts, ranging from sculptures, paintings to ceramics, textiles and calligraphy. The exhibitions, which display Nezu’s personal collections of antiquities, change regularly under various themes.

View from the entrance hall overlooking the Japanese garden. Tokyo, Japan, October 2014.

View from the entrance hall overlooking the Japanese garden. Tokyo, Japan, October 2014.

After visiting the exhibitions, a quiet stroll in the beautiful traditional Japanese garden adjacent to the museum building is highly recommended and should not be missed.

The path leading to the teahouse garden. Tokyo, Japan, October 2014.

The path leading to the teahouse garden. Tokyo, Japan, October 2014.

While walking in the garden, you can enjoy peace of mind, unwind and admire the beauty of nature in the surroundings. You may even forget that you are in the middle of Tokyo, one of the largest and busiest cities in the world.

A traditional Japanese boat on display in the garden. Tokyo, Japan, October 2014.

A traditional Japanese boat on display in the garden. Tokyo, Japan, October 2014.

The Japanese style is accentuated with ponds and several teahouses (chashitsu). Nezu Kaichiro was an enthusiastic practitioner of “the way of tea”, and the museum is prominent for arts related to tea. The garden also has a modern café, Nezucafé, where you can sip a cup of tea and enjoy the beautiful garden view.

: Local women dressed in beautiful kimono leaving a teahouse. Tea ceremonies are organized in wooden teahouses in the garden of Nezu Museum, a popular activity among tea aficionados in Tokyo. Tokyo, Japan, October 2014.

: Local women dressed in beautiful kimono leaving a teahouse. Tea ceremonies are organized in wooden teahouses in the garden of Nezu Museum, a popular activity among tea aficionados in Tokyo. Tokyo, Japan, October 2014.

A group of local people dressed in traditional costumes, admiring the tranquil nature by the pond on an early autumn day. Tokyo, Japan, October 2014.

A group of local people dressed in traditional costumes, admiring the tranquil nature by the pond on an early autumn day. Tokyo, Japan, October 2014.

For more information, please visit the museum’s website: http://www.nezu-muse.or.jp/en/

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